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A3D Stone sculpture named “Portal”

Jon Edgar reviews the naming process and how he came to the name Portal for the stone sculpture at the Devil’s Punch bowl in his blog post http://jonedgar.wordpress.com/2014/01/13/naming-a-hindhead-public-sculpture/

You can also see a short Paul Miller film on the working process behind Portal here: http://www.jonedgar.co.uk/film/

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Zoom A3D Hindhead is supported by the Heritage Lottery Fund.

A3D Hindhead is supported by the Heritage Lottery Fund.

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Horned Vorare

Suggested name for sculpture from Katherine Teakle

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Click for archive of stereo pair images of legacy stone

Charles Warner www.cloudstereo.org.uk/#jon has documented the development of the legacy stone using stereo pair photography, giving a 3D image.

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Zoom Denise drawing an end to formalities and suggesting that drinking hot chocolate in the NT Punch Bowl cafe might be a good idea…

Denise drawing an end to formalities and suggesting that drinking hot chocolate in the NT Punch Bowl cafe might be a good idea…

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Sir Jim Rose’s speech and cutting the ribbon

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Unveiling 23 March 2013

From Amber weather warning at launch in September 2012 we now had blizzard conditions for our unveiling in March 2013. Crazy times. It has been an amazing journey. Thanks to all those who have given their time and generosity to such a creative project where sculptures will stay as our marker long into the future.

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Congratulations to all involved!

I didn’t get a chance to really look at Ruth’s work in the snow and I could no longer feel my feet- I’ll be back though.


I did see Jon’s (et al) work- I love it! Every time a sculptor hits the chisel they make a decision, whether it’s to commit to a planned idea or step into the unknown. Both are evident here. A joy to behold.

Diarmuid Bryon O’Connor

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Zoom Sonia Percival at ceremony on 23rd March 2013.  It was cold! (Photo: Sue Slade)

Sonia Percival at ceremony on 23rd March 2013.  It was cold! (Photo: Sue Slade)

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Zoom Name the Sculpture - what do you think it should be called?
Jon Edgar’s sculpture sits on the course of the former A3 separating the National Trust’s Hindhead Common and the Devil’s Punch Bowl, GU26 6AB. Now tunnels have re-routed the London-Portsmouth traffic, the Heritage Lottery-funded A3D project celebrates the reunited landscape.  The 3 tonne legacy stone has been worked on site, outside, through the winter in one of the coldest places in southern England - with mallet and chisel. One saving grace has been that precipitation between December and March has been largely frozen.The un-preconceived carving has been worked over 45 days and the artist’s use of improvisation welcomed school children sketching up the quarry block.  Working from their prompts, the opened-up stone was turned over after 15 days carving, completely randomising the forms created, ready for the sculptor to trust something would come.The result has stimulated the community, with a video maker recording the process; another local responding to a broken mallet by fashioning a new handle from a chunk of local holly. Many visitors have experienced the arcane and solitary practice of the uncompromising sculptor.  All have contributed to the sense of place which has permeated the work.A name for the sculpture will be decided upon in October 2013. Get to know the stone and email your thoughts to jon@jonedgar.co.uk or tweet @massform or comment here where more images and video of the project can be seen. Spread the word so others can join in with naming this new landmark?


Name the Sculpture - what do you think it should be called?

Jon Edgar’s sculpture sits on the course of the former A3 separating the National Trust’s Hindhead Common and the Devil’s Punch Bowl, GU26 6AB. Now tunnels have re-routed the London-Portsmouth traffic, the Heritage Lottery-funded A3D project celebrates the reunited landscape.  The 3 tonne legacy stone has been worked on site, outside, through the winter in one of the coldest places in southern England - with mallet and chisel. One saving grace has been that precipitation between December and March has been largely frozen.

The un-preconceived carving has been worked over 45 days and the artist’s use of improvisation welcomed school children sketching up the quarry block.  Working from their prompts, the opened-up stone was turned over after 15 days carving, completely randomising the forms created, ready for the sculptor to trust something would come.

The result has stimulated the community, with a video maker recording the process; another local responding to a broken mallet by fashioning a new handle from a chunk of local holly. Many visitors have experienced the arcane and solitary practice of the uncompromising sculptor.  All have contributed to the sense of place which has permeated the work.

A name for the sculpture will be decided upon in October 2013. Get to know the stone and email your thoughts to jon@jonedgar.co.uk or tweet @massform or comment here where more images and video of the project can be seen. Spread the word so others can join in with naming this new landmark?

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